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Home / DIY Ideas / Built a custom barn door with a vintage stained glass window.

Built a custom barn door with a vintage stained glass window.

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The finished product first! I bought the stained glass panel from a flea market with the idea that I could cut a hole in the existing laundry room door and allow some light into the adjoining half bath.I don’t have a photo of the face my husband made when I told him that I wanted to build a door for the stained glass panel, but “skeptical” would describe it well. Once he was finally convinced, we headed to the local home improvement store for materials.The original plan was to construct the door from plain boards and paint the finished door white, but when we got to the store, we found gray shiplap siding and realized that it would make a great-looking door. Score! Total cost for the materials (excluding the stained glass) was about $100.The first step was to join the boards together. After arranging them face down, I screwed them together with short screws where they overlapped.The next step was to cut a frame of matching trim boards. This had two functions — it held the individual boards together (making the door stronger) and it covered the cut ends and made it look finished. Once those were laid in place, it began to look like a real door! Even before the trim boards were attached, I wanted be sure the window placement worked as expected, so I laid it on the boards to take a look. (Yes, I’m impatient!)Once we attached the trim and I decided where to place the stained glass panel, we marked the location and my adorable hubby cut the hole for the glass.We cut and installed a “frame” from matching trim boards to hold the glass in place and hide the cutout. After the frame for the stained glass was screwed in place, we flipped the door over and laid the glass in place. I was so stoked to see how it looked that I forgot to get a photo of this step. Oops! After the glass was set into the hole, we cut the “tongue” off scraps of siding to hold the glass place. Perfect cuts weren’t necessary, because the back will only be visible from inside of the laundry room when the door is closed.Once the glass was securely installed, we stood it up to see how it all looked!The barn door hardware hadn’t been delivered yet, so we brought the door inside, checked the fit and called it a day. One of the main motivations for this project was to get some light into the half bath that adjoins the laundry. The stained glass window allows light from the skylights in the laundry room into the half bath, but is opaque enough to hide the room itself.Two days later, the barn door hardware arrived. The instructions were awful, but thankfully, the installation turned out to be simple and intuitive. The u-shaped brackets were screwed into studs in the wall, and the rollers were screwed into the top of the door. Then, I put the “stops” on the track, put it in place and lifted the door onto the track.The old door was a pain because it blocked access to prime storage space in the laundry room. This one slides out of the way completely!Mission accomplished — we have light in the half bath! I’m really stoked at how it turned out.

Original author & source.

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